Basic rocket propulsion

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy, Engineering, Space

Newton stated in his third law that every action must have an equal and opposite reaction. This has proved extremely useful for rocket propulsion as the law demonstrates that if a large amount of fuel is rapidly ejected from the back of a vessel it is quite clear that there is a large force acting […]

Interview with Lord Rees

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy, Interview

  On the 10th of March YSJ Editorial Team Leader, Claire Nicholson, interviewed current Astronomer Royal, Martin Rees. Martin Rees is not only a Professor of Astronomy at Cambridge but also a member of the House of Lords. He is also a former President of the Royal Society. Martin told YSJ that being President of the Royal […]

Into Space without Rockets

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy

Sansith Hewapathirana, Nunthorpe Academy, Middlesbrough Abstract In this so-called space age the current method of space travel, rockets, is hugely prohibitive in cost. There are several possible ways with which we can truly embark into space. Including space elevators, launch loops, and space guns. This paper aims to update you on possible methods of space travel, […]

Science Bites

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry

For a few months now, I’ve been working on my eBook – Science Bites. Tomorrow it reaches the Amazon Kindle Store for £1.51. The idea behind the eBook was to make science fun and interesting – by using small, manageable pieces of information.  The eBook is about 180 pages long and covers topics from life […]

Birth of Saturn's Moon Witnessed

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy

Sorry for not posting in a while – we’ve been plagued with computer issues!   Scientists say they have potentially witnessed what they believe could be the birth of Saturn’s 63rd Moon.  The probe Cassini has taken a black and white image of Saturn’s outermost ring which is believed to hold the evidence. It’s such […]

Cosmic 'web' seen for the very first time

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy

The hidden tendrils of dark matter that can unlock hidden secrets of the universe may have been traced for the very first time. The Cosmology theory predicts that every galaxy is embedded in a cosmic web is “stuff”. Most of which, scientists believe is dark matter. Astronomers obtained these first direct images by using the […]

A Sense of Scale

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy, Issue 14

From sub-atomic to Universal, the range of scale tends towards infinity – in both directions. It could be argued that the small can be imagined as our minds can attempt to grapple with the concept of nothing and then it is only a case of imagining something getting infinitesimally closer to that limit. Yet with large scale we become stuck – viewing from or within a constricted radius of planet Earth it is difficult to put scale into perspective. We quickly lose our ability to compare the large with the larger which soon appear to be both insignificantly small in comparison to the larger still. This article helps rebalance scale. What you once thought big, you’ll think big no longer.

The Aurorae

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Astronomy, Issue 14

The Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis are one of the world’s seven natural wonders and have left men in awe for generations. This article investigates the causes of The Aurorae, the causes of the different colours and investigates Auroras on other planets such as the Jovian Aurora on Jupiter.